asexualityresources

Anonymous asked:

How do you make a sexual individual understand what asexuality is? People keep dismissing my sexual orientation believing is just a myth. It's unbelievably annoying and disrespectful to me because they keep assuming they know me better than I know myself. Any suggestions?

asexualityresources answered:

Hello Anon,

It’s frustrating that people don’t accept that asexuality is real. It may help you to have some links and evidence to hand that will explain asexuality and prove it’s real. I posted these starting points in another answer, but I’ll repost them here because they’re useful when explaining or defending asexuality:

It sucks, but oftentimes sources like this can be more persuasive than individual accounts. If people continue to dismiss your asexuality, tell them that they’re being hurtful, disrespectful, and wilfully ignorant in the face of your experience and overwhelming evidence that asexuality exists. 

Best of luck; let me know if I can help out it any other way.

– Sebastian.

wertheyouth
wertheyouth:

"Becoming homecoming king is kind of the only normal teenage dream I’ve had. I was really surprised, though, that I was nominated. I didn’t think it was attainable because I’m trans. But now I feel like I could get it. I’m taking the steps that need to be made for progress among the transgender community. I’m just trying to make the T in LGBT not so silent."
Blake, Age 17, Charlotte, NC. Photo by Laurel Golio. As told to Diana Scholl.

(cc legalizetrans)

Read more about Blake at We Are the Youth. And don’t forget to buy We Are the Youth: the book, which shares stories of LGBT youth throughout the United States!

wertheyouth:

"Becoming homecoming king is kind of the only normal teenage dream I’ve had. I was really surprised, though, that I was nominated. I didn’t think it was attainable because I’m trans. But now I feel like I could get it. I’m taking the steps that need to be made for progress among the transgender community. I’m just trying to make the T in LGBT not so silent."

Blake, Age 17, Charlotte, NC. Photo by Laurel Golio. As told to Diana Scholl.

(cc legalizetrans)

Read more about Blake at We Are the Youth. And don’t forget to buy We Are the Youth: the book, which shares stories of LGBT youth throughout the United States!

gayqueers

marcoxmarco:

minus18:

For me and my friends growing up, being told things like ‘you have to wear this because that’s what boys wear” or “dresses are for not for your body type” was frustrating and a pretty bad time.




The bottom line for me is, if someone feels happier and more comfortable in a particular ‘type’ of uniform, then that’s something that should be encouraged, not punished. Students have enough to focus on at school, having to fight to be yourself shouldn’t be added to that.



That’s why we’ve launched a new campaign called Gender is Not Uniform.

<3

gaywrites
gaywrites:

"Our LGBT community is resilient and strong, and particularly for those of us who are young and have our entire lives in front of us, it may feel like we are invincible. I’ve learned the hard way that I’m not. Cancer has taken a lot from me physically and emotionally. But it hasn’t taken away my voice, and it hasn’t taken away my hope. I hope to find out two weeks from now that I’m cancer-free."
Andy Cray, an activist for trans equality, health care access, and LGBT youth, died yesterday after battling cancer. He was 28. This Sunday will be his one-week wedding anniversary. Though I didn’t know him personally, we have many mutual friends from college and activist circles. His passing is nothing short of heartbreaking. 
He wrote a piece for the Advocate a while back about his battle with cancer and the importance of health care; read it here. If you are so moved, his family and friends have asked that donations be made in his name to the National Center for Transgender Equality.
Thank you for everything, Andy. You made lives better. 

RIP Andy, a wonderful advocate and person.

gaywrites:

"Our LGBT community is resilient and strong, and particularly for those of us who are young and have our entire lives in front of us, it may feel like we are invincible. I’ve learned the hard way that I’m not. Cancer has taken a lot from me physically and emotionally. But it hasn’t taken away my voice, and it hasn’t taken away my hope. I hope to find out two weeks from now that I’m cancer-free."

Andy Cray, an activist for trans equality, health care access, and LGBT youth, died yesterday after battling cancer. He was 28. This Sunday will be his one-week wedding anniversary. Though I didn’t know him personally, we have many mutual friends from college and activist circles. His passing is nothing short of heartbreaking. 

He wrote a piece for the Advocate a while back about his battle with cancer and the importance of health care; read it here. If you are so moved, his family and friends have asked that donations be made in his name to the National Center for Transgender Equality.

Thank you for everything, Andy. You made lives better. 

RIP Andy, a wonderful advocate and person.