Thanks for the wonderful write-up, He Said Magazine!
“By combining the photographs of Laurel Golio with writing by Diana Scholl, We Are the Youth is a visual feast of diversity that fascinates page after page.”

Thanks for the wonderful write-up, He Said Magazine!

By combining the photographs of Laurel Golio with writing by Diana Scholl, We Are the Youth is a visual feast of diversity that fascinates page after page.”

fuckyeahqueerpeopleofcolor

fuckyeahlgbtqartists:

TransCuba: Photographer Mariette Pathy Allen Explores a Hidden Havana Subculture

For more than 30 years, New York based photographer and painter Mariette Pathy Allenhas been documenting transgender culture worldwide; in 2004 she won the Lambda Literary Award for her monograph The Gender Frontier. In her new publication, TransCuba, Allen focuses on the transgender community of Cuba, especially its growing visibility and acceptance in a country whose government is transitioning into a more relaxed model of communism under Raúl Castro’s presidency.
 
An excerpt from Mariela Castro Espin, who is the director of the Cuban National Center for Sex Education in Havana, is included in the book: “We dedicate this day to families because we want families to be conscious of their great social responsibility, so that all of our families, all of the people with the great social responsibility of being a parent, realize that their can’t be any form of discrimination in the family, discrimination based in the prejudice that we’ve inherited from dominant societies.”

wertheyouth
wertheyouth:

We Are the Youth is Now in Print!
We Are the Youth is based on the online photojournalism project that shares the stories of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer youth in the United States. Through portraits by photographer Laurel Golio and “as told to” personal essays by writer Diana Scholl, this book captures the incredible strength and diversity of LGBTQ youth.
Order your copy today! And if it’s within you means, consider donating a copy of We Are the Youth to an organization that works directly with LGBTQ youth. See a list of participating organizations here.
$19.99 • published by space-made • wearetheyouth.org

wertheyouth:

We Are the Youth is Now in Print!

We Are the Youth is based on the online photojournalism project that shares the stories of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer youth in the United States. Through portraits by photographer Laurel Golio and “as told to” personal essays by writer Diana Scholl, this book captures the incredible strength and diversity of LGBTQ youth.

Order your copy today! And if it’s within you means, consider donating a copy of We Are the Youth to an organization that works directly with LGBTQ youth. See a list of participating organizations here.

$19.99 • published by space-made • wearetheyouth.org

In our culture, the impulse to distance oneself from negatives associated with women and femininity is endemic. When we insult men, we do it by comparing them to women. When we compare women to men, we’re generally praising them. In fact, I’ve probably known more straight, cis-gendered women who’ve bragged about how they’re “one of the guys” than I’ve known lesbians. Ironically, one of the things I share with many women is my eagerness to point out all the ways in which I’m not like other women.

As girls grow up, they are bombarded by rules and restrictions governing the ways that they can be. I know I was—otherwise I wouldn’t have been a fully grown adult before I started wearing clothes that I found comfortable. These gendered rules confine girls’ choices and constrain their self-expression. Perhaps one day the gender binary will be dismantled totally, and we’ll all stop limiting our children by bringing them up as either males or females. But, in the meantime, gender continues to be one of the first things children learn to recognize about themselves and others, and for that reason I think it’s important to keep the boundaries of what can and can’t potentially be male or female propped open as wide as possible. It’s wonderful that people who feel uncomfortable with the gender they were assigned at birth are gaining strength and visibility. But, it’s just as important that young people, girls and boys and genderqueers alike, can have as many examples as possible of men and women who don’t conform to gender stereotypes. I like to think I’m doing my part for that by living as an aggressive, competitive, logical, and strong butch woman.

Why I’m Still a Butch Lesbian, by Vanessa Vitiello Urquhart
transqueermediaexchange
fuckyeahmtfs:

Businesses That Offer at Least One Transgender-Inclusive Health Care Coverage Plan
So I know the HRC is pretty damn shitty to us trans folk. But this is still the best comprehensive thing I have seen with employers that offer trans* inclusive benefits. 
I set a click through link to a high resolution.
A lot of these are worth a Google to find out what they really are. Like Darden Restaurants, that’s Olive Garden and Red Lobster. 
If you can get a full-time job at one of these places, they will (most likely) offer GRS/SRS in the insurance plan. If you take a look here, you can see what companies have what restrictions about it. Eg, age, time on hormones, ‘real life experience’, all that bs.
Hopefully this will help some of you get jobs at places that will actually do you some good.
For the rest of the Corporate Equality Index, look here.
Please reblog this at the least, even if you don’t care, your friends or fellow trans people might.

fuckyeahmtfs:

Businesses That Offer at Least One Transgender-Inclusive Health Care Coverage Plan

So I know the HRC is pretty damn shitty to us trans folk. But this is still the best comprehensive thing I have seen with employers that offer trans* inclusive benefits. 

I set a click through link to a high resolution.

A lot of these are worth a Google to find out what they really are. Like Darden Restaurants, that’s Olive Garden and Red Lobster. 

If you can get a full-time job at one of these places, they will (most likely) offer GRS/SRS in the insurance plan. If you take a look here, you can see what companies have what restrictions about it. Eg, age, time on hormones, ‘real life experience’, all that bs.

Hopefully this will help some of you get jobs at places that will actually do you some good.

For the rest of the Corporate Equality Index, look here.

Please reblog this at the least, even if you don’t care, your friends or fellow trans people might.